Thursday, June 15, 2017

2017 Falkland Stampede

The 99th annual Falkland Stampede was held May 20-22. Yes, it was a few weeks ago, but it's only been a few hours since I've been able to see the top of my desk again, so bear with me.

Now that I've had time to go through my photos, let me share a few with you. These have a unique angle because I'm up in a room beside the announcer's booth, above the arena. And not all the events are represented because I can only take photos when I'm not working ... which is why I'm there in the first place, as rodeo cashier.

The weather was perfect. The crowds were great. The volunteers are mostly rested and recovered. Here's a little bit of what happened in the arena.

The Falkland Stampede is a three day professional rodeo.
Some of the competitors you'll see competing here - and even some of the animals -
 will also be in the Canadian Finals Rodeo, the National Finals Rodeo and
the Calgary Stampede.

The action is fast and furious.
And lest you feel sorry for the animals, remember that most of them
work less hours in a year than regular ranch horses do in a month.

... and oftentimes, the rider doesn't win the contest. 

Calf ropers waiting for their turn.


... and watching how the other guys are doing. 

The stands were full to capacity on Sunday. Great crowd.

Trick riders entertained each day during intermission.

And then came the calf scramble, where sheer numbers of kids
finally win against the long legs of the "magpie" calves.

Three dairy calves have ribbons tied to their tails, and the kids
try to grab the ribbons for prizes and glory!

"It's all good!" says event co-organizer Stacey.

Bull riding is the last event each day of every rodeo.
It's the main event for many folks.

Again I say, if you were ever to feel sorry for the bull,
check his size against the kid on his back.

These bulls are serious athletes, and they generally win.

The longhorn blood in this fellow adds to his spunk.

The kid is giving it his best ...

... but he's down ...

... and that bull wants to eat him up.
The bullfighter coming up on the left keeps that from happening.

It's not all rough-and-tumble.
Early Monday morning, the heavy horses come into the arena to compete.

They work hard and are lovely to watch.
Most of these teams are working teams, on ranches or in hand-logging operations.

It's sometimes hard to figure out how these cowboys stick to the horses.

Makes for very dramatic photos!

Especially when they explode out of  the chute.


Rodeo manager Jason Churchill with this year's Life Membership honorees:
CPRA rodeo secretary Marion Pippolo (my hero), and local long-time
volunteers Gayle Carson and Dari Churchill.

Time to go home. See y'all next year!

Next year is the 100th rodeo. Not bad for a place with less than 1000 people. 

1 comment:

  1. My goodness, I feel worn-out after looking at those pictures! I remember my father going to the Calgary Rodeo in 1953!

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